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Creative Writing - Comic Scriptwriting

Credential: Ontario Graduate Certificate Program Code: 12232 Length: 2 semesters

Programs Starting Between:

To be eligible for admission, you must possess the following:

  • A bachelor’s degree, diploma or advanced diploma

All applicants whose first language is not English must meet Humber’s English Language Proficiency Policy.

Mature Applicants

An applicant is considered a mature applicant if they have not completed secondary school or other postsecondary school, and will be 19 or older (21 or older for degree programs) as of the first day of classes. Humber will invite you for testing to demonstrate that you meet program eligibility. Mature applicants for degree programs will be required to meet course requirements at the U level or equivalent.

College Transfer Applicants

An applicant is considered a college transfer applicant if they have completed some or all of a college-level credential. Humber will use your college courses and grades to determine program eligibility. You may also be eligible for transfer credit if you are admitted to a Humber program.

University Transfer Applicants

An applicant is considered a university transfer applicant if they have completed some or all of a university-level credential. Humber will use your university courses and grades to determine program eligibility. You may also be eligible for transfer credit if you are admitted to a Humber program.

Selection Includes Secondary Requirements:

Admission selection is based on the academic criteria indicated and the result of the evaluation of additional secondary requirements. Secondary requirements may include a portfolio, audition, letter of intent, references, etc., and vary by program. Meeting minimum eligibility requirements does not guarantee an offer of admission.

Date Location Availability International Student Availability
January 2017OnlineOpenOpen
May 2017OnlineOpenOpen
September 2017OnlineOpenOpen
January 2018OnlineOpenOpen
May 2018OnlineOpenOpen

The 2016/2017 fee for two semesters was:

  • domestic $3,240.27
  • international $3,615.27.

Amounts listed were the total of tuition, lab and material fees, student service and auxiliary fees for the first two semesters of the 2016/2017 academic year. Fees are subject to change.

Fees by Semester >

Scholarships

Humber offers a variety of scholarships each year.

Learn more >

Program Contact(s)

Hilary Higgins
Program Assistant
416.675.6622 ext. 3449
hilary.higgins@humber.ca

Admissions

416-675-5000
enquiry@humber.ca

International Students

Phone 1-416-675-5067
international@humber.ca

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Apply to Humber

Applications to Humber are made through ontariocolleges.ca. Be sure to submit your application by the equal consideration deadline of February 1. You may apply after February 1, however, post-February 1 applications will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis depending on the availability of the space in the program. To check program availability refer to the Campus/Availability listing on Humber's program pages or ontariocolleges.ca.

Admission Road Map >

Apply through Ontario Colleges >

International Students

If you’re an international student, you can apply directly to Humber via our International Centre.

Apply through the International Centre >

In order to continue with your application for Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting, you must complete this step in the application process. Applicant selection is based on academic criteria and results of these secondary requirements. This contains all information to prepare and submit secondary requirements for consideration. If you have any questions, please contact Admissions.

Secondary Requirements

Applicants are required to submit:

  • A brief one-page description of the work you intend to complete during the 30-week correspondence program.

Submission Instructions

Applicants must submit the one-page description through SlideRoom. SlideRoom is a secure site where secondary requirements are collected, scored and stored. Log-in to https://humber.slideroom.com and create your free account. There will be additional instructions once your account has been created.

Applicants must meet both academic and secondary requirements in order to meet minimum program eligibility. Meeting minimum eligibility does not guarantee an offer of admission.

All secondary requirements will be evaluated and a score will be calculated by the academic school.

Admission decisions will be available via MyHumber, or by email and mail. Admission decisions will not be released by phone.

Fees by Semester

Semester 1 Domestic Fee International Fee*
Total $2,940.27 $2,940.27
Tuition $2,436.76 $2,436.76
Mandatory Non-Tuition $503.51 $503.51
Lab/Materials $0.00 $0.00
Co-op/Placement    

 

Semester 2 Domestic Fee International Fee*
Total $300.00 $300.00
Tuition $300.00 $300.00
Mandatory Non-Tuition    
Lab/Materials $0.00 $0.00
Co-op/Placement    

*Plus Mandatory Health Insurance fee once per academic year: Fall start - $375 Winter start - $250 Summer start - $125

Our Program

Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Courses Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

  • Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

  • Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

  • Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

  • Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

  • Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

  • Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

  • Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

  • Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

  • Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

  • Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

  • Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

  • Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

  • Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

  • Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.


Close

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

The Humber Advantage

comedy showcase 2012

Student Testimonial

"This comedy script writing course with David Flaherty has been an amazing experience in self- and art discovery. It has given me the freedom to have fun writing seriously about fun. I think it was Garrick, the Victorian actor-manager, who said on his deathbed, “Dying is easy, comedy is hard.” Well, he didn’t know that writing comedy can be as difficult as dying but also as easy as breathing, given the guidance we have here."
-Marye Barton (2007)

Every attempt is made to ensure that information contained in this website is current and accurate. Humber reserves the right to correct any error or omission, modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable or campus location at any time without prior notice or liability to users or any other Person.